Andy on Twitter

  • Every Company Will Be a Fintech Company ,
  • nice placement ,
  • Why you should plan to travel to Australia NOW... so right... ,
  • Samsung's Neon artificial humans aren't artificial or human enough | WIRED UK @soulmachines,
  • Was there this morning - at 5am the smoke blanketing the city was awful. Can only imagine what it would like to be… ,
  • Fascinating... 6 things to ask yourself before you share a bushfire map on social media ,
  • Great read for marketers on creating a category and why marketing starts with product... ,
  • Genius ,
  • Fake News & Fake Humans « The Daily Lark ,
  • Fake News & Fake Humans - Samsung's announcements at CES ,
  • Perhaps the worst ad I've seen in a while and further reflection of how most Fintech's don't actually have a busine… ,
  • Don't think I've ever seen a bigger gap between what a bunch of politicians think and what the public sees and feel… ,
  • The bushfires make my ongoing saga a truly first-world kind of problem. Amazing a company of this scale can be so bad.,
  • Explainer: how effective is bushfire hazard reduction on Australia's fires? | Australia news | The Guardian ,
  • Just staggering... Fresh Cambridge Analytica leak ‘shows global manipulation is out of control’ | UK news | The Gua… ,

Archive for the ‘Link Love’ Category

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the Internet makes us superficial

Definitely plan to write more on this… Nick points to A recent edition of Science featured a worrying paper by University of Chicago sociologist James A. Evans titled Electronic Publication and the Narrowing of Science and Scholarship.

Seeking to learn more about how research is conducted online, Evans scoured a database of 34 million articles from science journals. He discovered a paradox: as journals begin publishing online, making it easier for researchers to find and search their contents, research tends to become more superficial.

Evans summarizes his findings in a new post on the Britannica Blog:

[My study] showed that as more journals and articles came online, the actual number of them cited in research decreased, and those that were cited tended to be of more recent vintage. This proved true for virtually all fields of science … Moreover, the easy online availability of sources has channeled researcher attention from the periphery to the core—to the most high-status journals. In short, searching online is more efficient, and hyperlinks quickly put researchers in touch with prevailing opinion, but they may also accelerate consensus and narrow the range of findings and ideas grappled with by scholars.

If part of the Carr thesis [in “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”] is that we are lazier online, and if efficiency is laziness (more results for less energy expended), then in professional science and scholarship, researchers yearn to be lazy…they want to produce more for less.

Ironically, my research suggests that one of the chief values of print library research is its poor indexing. Poor indexing—indexing by titles and authors, primarily within journals—likely had the unintended consequence of actually helping the integration of science and scholarship. By drawing researchers into a wider array of articles, print browsing and perusal may have facilitated broader comparisons and scholarship.

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Twitter Updates for 2008-03-05

  • back in Austin #
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Twitter Updates for 2008-02-29

  • off earnings and back to work now… #
  • wife says twittering is the lazy mans blogging… #
  • coming soon… writing a 6 page essay now #
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Twitter Updates for 2008-02-27

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Twitter Updates for 2008-02-26