Andy on Twitter

  • Beggars belief that our government can abandon all democratic processes, enforce isolation, lock down cities but no… ,
  • Spot on... Coronavirus Melbourne: Democracy is slowly eclipsed in Daniel Andrews’s Victoria ,
  • You will never look at an Apple Lightning cable the same again... ,
  • I reckon we need to get the best minds in app development together and build a better COVIDSafe app. The Govt version isn’t good at all.,
  • Spot on. Brand purpose. The biggest lie the ad industry ever told? – Tom Roach ,
  • Not to take anything away from the seriousness of Covid and the need for each of us to act responsibly but the math… ,
  • Paths are Made by Walking, Not Waiting: One Lesson We Forget in Hard Times ,
  • Marketers Have Given Up on Context, And Our National Discourse Is Suffering ,
  • Hey, would be grateful if you could support this. Signing is all you need to do. It is critical we protect this ama… ,
  • Have you caught the remote-working bug? ,
  • Sad to see one of the best CMOs around moving on. ,
  • CEO’s that send emails from noreply addresses need a basic education in customer experience @nurasound,
  • Great list... 50 Ideas That Changed My Life ,
  • So mastering digital marketing comes down to SEO, SEM and Social. OMG. Really ⁦@LBS⁩? The nonsense never ends... ,
  • Do not buy the new nura loops. I loved my old Nura over-the-ear headphones but the Nuraloops are a disas… ,

Archive for the ‘Link Love’ Category

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the Internet makes us superficial

Definitely plan to write more on this… Nick points to A recent edition of Science featured a worrying paper by University of Chicago sociologist James A. Evans titled Electronic Publication and the Narrowing of Science and Scholarship.

Seeking to learn more about how research is conducted online, Evans scoured a database of 34 million articles from science journals. He discovered a paradox: as journals begin publishing online, making it easier for researchers to find and search their contents, research tends to become more superficial.

Evans summarizes his findings in a new post on the Britannica Blog:

[My study] showed that as more journals and articles came online, the actual number of them cited in research decreased, and those that were cited tended to be of more recent vintage. This proved true for virtually all fields of science … Moreover, the easy online availability of sources has channeled researcher attention from the periphery to the core—to the most high-status journals. In short, searching online is more efficient, and hyperlinks quickly put researchers in touch with prevailing opinion, but they may also accelerate consensus and narrow the range of findings and ideas grappled with by scholars.

If part of the Carr thesis [in “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”] is that we are lazier online, and if efficiency is laziness (more results for less energy expended), then in professional science and scholarship, researchers yearn to be lazy…they want to produce more for less.

Ironically, my research suggests that one of the chief values of print library research is its poor indexing. Poor indexing—indexing by titles and authors, primarily within journals—likely had the unintended consequence of actually helping the integration of science and scholarship. By drawing researchers into a wider array of articles, print browsing and perusal may have facilitated broader comparisons and scholarship.

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Twitter Updates for 2008-03-05

  • back in Austin #
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Twitter Updates for 2008-02-29

  • off earnings and back to work now… #
  • wife says twittering is the lazy mans blogging… #
  • coming soon… writing a 6 page essay now #
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Twitter Updates for 2008-02-27

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Twitter Updates for 2008-02-26