Andy on Twitter

  • Further spotlighting the Wallabies Woes ,
  • Like wo has tapes anyway? Or even a tape recorder? Or a tape player? Or a fax? ,
  • RH: respect the opportunity you have @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: Stay humble. Work hard. What happened yesterday has no relevance to today or next week. Don't wait for chance. @Cannes_Lions,
  • RH: companies matter in terms of getting stories out to people. @Cannes_Lions,
  • RH points to Trad media co's entering OTT ... @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: nothing bad happens that doesn't have some good associated with it @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: Eventually will be a NFL team in London @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: The future is OTT - which means goodbye TV as we know it. Mobile + streaming + integration with games = winner @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft is concerned middle class not doing as well as they should. So right @Cannes_Lions,
  • The hard thing and the right thing are the same thing. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Practice patience. Never make a change unless you have something better. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Great orgs are built on inspired talent that is difficult to manage, sometimes large in confidence and ego, strong: Kraft at @Cannes_Lions,
  • The best tend to be the most creative - and tend to be the most difficult. As a leader you must learn to live with that. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Cannes debate underway.,
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DeLinkification

All those links can be very distracting. Nick gets at this point very clearly:

The link is, in a way, a technologically advanced form of a footnote. It’s also, distraction-wise, a more violent form of a footnote. Where a footnote gives your brain a gentle nudge, the link gives it a yank. What’s good about a link – its propulsive force – is also what’s bad about it.

I don’t want to overstate the cognitive penalty produced by the hyperlink (or understate the link’s allure and usefulness), but the penalty seems to be real, and we should be aware of it. In The Shallows, I examine the hyperlink as just one element among many – including multimedia, interruptions, multitasking, jerky eye movements, divided attention, extraneous decision making, even social anxiety – that tend to promote hurried, distracted, and superficial thinking online. To understand the effects of the Web on our minds, you have to consider the cumulative effects of all these features rather than just the effects of any one individually.

You can read more here. And some more below. Lets put links at the end.

Salon review

Neuorethics at the Core post

Standage’s tweeted chortle

The Shallows site

Speak Up — Add Your Thoughts

Connections

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