Andy on Twitter

  • Well, I’m furious at him and the equally draconian policies of NSW Govt. Seems you can do whatever you like in Gov… ,
  • Impression is Govt as a whole knows how to implement draconian policies with no public engagement or addressing dow… ,
  • And why not fix the crappy Covid App and make it a requirement to have it and your mobile with you at all times so… ,
  • I’ve just done 14 days self isolation on returning from Vic. Isn’t hard to do. And would have been happy to pay for… ,
  • This is just another example of heavy handed Govt policies with little thought for business or personal impacts. Al… ,
  • NSW latest move to force residents returning from Vic into mandatory isolation is poorly thought out. Instead just… ,
  • NZ needs this, Australia needs this. Instead of heavy handed Government policies implemented in the main without a… ,
  • Well, my Mac is over at the Apple Hospital being repaired - keyboard failure... iPad is worthless as a business too… ,
  • It's time to Dub on Telstra - more on the Dubber news from yesterday. ,
  • Big move by in going native on the Telstra network for Liberate, TIPT and SIP. Game changer… ,
  • Ummm... Yep... mess is an understatement 'A complete mess': angry business demands clarity from Victoria -… ,
  • Great piece from Stephane on Tokenized Banking and how it creates a better banking experience. Great prod… ,
  • Yep, those are the questions to ask. ,
  • Might just be me but feels like has descended into product and app anarchy. An S1 controller and now I need… ,
  • Gald to see this. The amount of corrupt marketing undertaken by Bitcoin companies is staggering. Steve Wozniak sues… ,
  • Connect

Better to be reviled than ignored

If I had a hundred bucks for every client that had told me “there is no such thing as bad publicity” I’d be a rich man. I’ve never really bought the argument – although one shouldn’t confuse a igniting controversy with a catastrophic and negative event.

Studies suggest it all comes down to your prominence. Alan Sorensen, a economics professor at Stanford University School of Business looked at the effect of book reviews in the New York Times (study published in Marketing Science). Positive reviews by well known authors sold 42% more while negative reviews caused sales to drop by 15%.

It was a different story for unknown authors. Bad or good, a review bumped sales by a third. Can we apply the same idea to business. Say to a relatively obscure company? I’d argue it all depends on the product. Say you make an expensive lock to protect a racing bike – a bad review for a product that to which low subjectivity applies will crater sales. That’s different to, say, a low-cost book or MP3 file to which there is a simple purchasing cycle, low monetary value and high subjectivity.

And inquisitiveness resulting from a poor review shouldn’t been seen as a proxy for buying. The argument that Borat caused tourism enquiries to increase as proof of the positive effect of a negative review only holds water if the only measure was increased enquiries. It didn’t actually mean any more people visited.

At the end of the day good press matters as much as positive recommendations. And, while a negative review might be ok for the obscure, for anything of value (product or personal brand) it can be a killer.

>> see Economist Feb 26 2011, Bad Publicity

Speak Up — Add Your Thoughts

Connections

  • Connect
How did you connect?   [?]