Andy on Twitter

  • If believes it should be shut down perhaps he should start by deleting the app and not using Twitter anymore. ,
  • It remains baffling to me why folks can't distinguish between private sealed mail and very public communication on… ,
  • Great read from Jared Diamond: lessons from a pandemic | Financial Times - ,
  • Likely due to my contribution of late... Whisky production goes from strength to strength - via @shareaholic,
  • Love but word of caution on their Flight Credits. Read the small print. My reco is just ask for a refund. Bit of a rort...,
  • McLaren Group remembers the tragic passing of its brilliant founder ,
  • Don’t you just love all these comparisons suggesting this is just like the GFC. ,
  • European Commission Presents Guidelines to Reopen Tourism | Travel Agent Central ,
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  • A class act and the right way to handle things. In stark contrast to many others...A Message from Co-Founder and C… ,
  • Brilliant read... Signaling as a Service « ,
  • Great read... China: Out of Lockdown - We Are Social Australia ,
  • I reckon with all this isolation and time we start an Apple Revolution (admittedly #1,000 on my todo-list) where we… ,
  • Apple calls it the Magic Keyboard because the current keyboard is unmagical. But we paid for magic - and got shit.… ,
  • Ok, I'm an fanboy... but why not offer to upgrade recent Macbooks? None of these features warrants a new sys… ,

Archive for the ‘Performance’ Category

  • Connect

The Makers Schedule

Paul is right – you nee to understand what kid of schedule you are on. More managers though need to get some of the Makers Schedule into their week. Too many confuse being busy with creating value or achieving progress. Thus the Managers Schedule becomes a productivity illusion.

There are two types of schedule, which I’ll call the manager’s schedule and the maker’s schedule. The manager’s schedule is for bosses. It’s embodied in the traditional appointment book, with each day cut into one hour intervals. You can block off several hours for a single task if you need to, but by default you change what you’re doing every hour.

When you use time that way, it’s merely a practical problem to meet with someone. Find an open slot in your schedule, book them, and you’re done.

Most powerful people are on the manager’s schedule. It’s the schedule of command. But there’s another way of using time that’s common among people who make things, like programmers and writers. They generally prefer to use time in units of half a day at least. You can’t write or program well in units of an hour. That’s barely enough time to get started.

When you’re operating on the maker’s schedule, meetings are a disaster. A single meeting can blow a whole afternoon, by breaking it into two pieces each too small to do anything hard in. Plus you have to remember to go to the meeting. That’s no problem for someone on the manager’s schedule. There’s always something coming on the next hour; the only question is what. But when someone on the maker’s schedule has a meeting, they have to think about it.

For someone on the maker’s schedule, having a meeting is like throwing an exception. It doesn’t merely cause you to switch from one task to another; it changes the mode in which you work.

  • Connect

You Versus Sleep

Was reading these amazing stats that compare the average rider with a TDF rider. What was really staggering was the work to sleep ratio. Clear message that we all ignore too much – Performance requires sleep.

During the Tour, the pros average about 2 hours of sleep for every hour of racing.