Andy on Twitter

  • Would be consistent with what they’ve done around the world. And their right to do so. What the Aussie Govt is prop… ,
  • It’s interesting to me how when a company () details how it will respond to legislation it is deemed by the… ,
  • Good read on the interference of Govt in how the Internet works... Internet's founder, US officials slap down News… ,
  • OMG. So sad... ,
  • Good look at the impacts of SAH on compliance and tech... Be Prepared to Stay at Home in 2021 – even if you don’t w… ,
  • Dense Discovery is still my favourite newsletter. Look forward to it each week. Well worth supporting IMHO.… ,
  • Great read... I Feel Better Now | Jake Bittle ,
  • Another great example of cluelessness. Google has a right to exercise inordinate power over its own products. Just… ,
  • via ... is hard for us here to laugh. States now run the country abs SOMO sitting on the sidelines. ,
  • Still a bit surprising to me how often people confuse a successful company with a monopoly. And how they will compl… ,
  • And what about the rest of the Internet... they'll ask to dip their hand into the Google coffers as well... this is… ,
  • And oh, isn't Google fully within its rights to say "nah, don't think so, "we'll just stop surfacing news we have t… ,

Archive for the ‘Performance’ Category

  • Connect

The Makers Schedule

Paul is right – you nee to understand what kid of schedule you are on. More managers though need to get some of the Makers Schedule into their week. Too many confuse being busy with creating value or achieving progress. Thus the Managers Schedule becomes a productivity illusion.

There are two types of schedule, which I’ll call the manager’s schedule and the maker’s schedule. The manager’s schedule is for bosses. It’s embodied in the traditional appointment book, with each day cut into one hour intervals. You can block off several hours for a single task if you need to, but by default you change what you’re doing every hour.

When you use time that way, it’s merely a practical problem to meet with someone. Find an open slot in your schedule, book them, and you’re done.

Most powerful people are on the manager’s schedule. It’s the schedule of command. But there’s another way of using time that’s common among people who make things, like programmers and writers. They generally prefer to use time in units of half a day at least. You can’t write or program well in units of an hour. That’s barely enough time to get started.

When you’re operating on the maker’s schedule, meetings are a disaster. A single meeting can blow a whole afternoon, by breaking it into two pieces each too small to do anything hard in. Plus you have to remember to go to the meeting. That’s no problem for someone on the manager’s schedule. There’s always something coming on the next hour; the only question is what. But when someone on the maker’s schedule has a meeting, they have to think about it.

For someone on the maker’s schedule, having a meeting is like throwing an exception. It doesn’t merely cause you to switch from one task to another; it changes the mode in which you work.

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You Versus Sleep

Was reading these amazing stats that compare the average rider with a TDF rider. What was really staggering was the work to sleep ratio. Clear message that we all ignore too much – Performance requires sleep.

During the Tour, the pros average about 2 hours of sleep for every hour of racing.