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  • Self help posts on Medium have reached toxic levels. .,
  • Malcolm Turnbull thinks Australia Post's CEO is overpaid - and it looks like he's the world's most expensive postie ,
  • “Algolia: The Most Impactful Early Sales Tactics” ,
  • DropBox story is just amazing – From zero to a billion in a decade ,
  • Wandered into JBHifi. Had what I needed on display but not in stock. Why merch what you don't have. Bring on Amazon. .,
  • Wow, was waiting for Amazon to arrive and nuke Aussie retail. Seems they Rent needed. Herringbone and R&B now in VA. ,
  • I Work from Home - The New Yorker ,
  • Dan has some good thoughts here on defining social media success by on @LinkedIn,
  • It's like forgot about dashboard in OSX. Why not just remove it?,
  • Great thoughts on agile marketing. ,
  • They are back! I want one of those hats! Jamiroquai - Automaton via @YouTube,
  • What happened to our Democratic leaders ? The silence is deafening. Stand-up with us and fight this. ,
  • So many clever fintech startups emerging and getting funding ,
  • Reading the latest economist - strikes me how bad B2B advertising is. Why do Co's think animating bad ads makes them better?,
  • Great read.... ,
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The Tipping Point

The Tipping Point

A great post from Jeff. Like he says:

The data suggests that there are two very different patterns going on with respect to e-commerce penetration. The two largest categories — “Food and Beverage” and “Health and Personal Care” — show e-commerce penetration well below the overall average. These categories essentially are the domains of grocery stores and drug stores, and e-commerce (at least to date) has achieved only modest penetration of these massive categories (but Amazon Fresh has designs on changing that).

The other four categories are what I would consider to be the domains of traditional specialty retail categories, the ones that are transacted in the malls of America. All of these demonstrate e-commerce penetration well above the overall average, ranging from a low of 12 percent for “Clothing and Accessories,” up to 24 percent for “Media, Sporting and Hobby Goods.” It’s in these specialty retail categories where e-commerce to date has had its strongest impact.

One additional observation is that the pace of online share gain in the specialty retail categories shows absolutely no signs of slowing down. All of these charts are “up and to the right.”

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