Andy on Twitter

  • Further spotlighting the Wallabies Woes ,
  • Like wo has tapes anyway? Or even a tape recorder? Or a tape player? Or a fax? ,
  • RH: respect the opportunity you have @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: Stay humble. Work hard. What happened yesterday has no relevance to today or next week. Don't wait for chance. @Cannes_Lions,
  • RH: companies matter in terms of getting stories out to people. @Cannes_Lions,
  • RH points to Trad media co's entering OTT ... @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: nothing bad happens that doesn't have some good associated with it @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: Eventually will be a NFL team in London @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: The future is OTT - which means goodbye TV as we know it. Mobile + streaming + integration with games = winner @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft is concerned middle class not doing as well as they should. So right @Cannes_Lions,
  • The hard thing and the right thing are the same thing. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Practice patience. Never make a change unless you have something better. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Great orgs are built on inspired talent that is difficult to manage, sometimes large in confidence and ego, strong: Kraft at @Cannes_Lions,
  • The best tend to be the most creative - and tend to be the most difficult. As a leader you must learn to live with that. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Cannes debate underway.,
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The Naked CEO

This great piece on the value of transparency and pretty much a must read for communicators. Clive’s blog is worth a look as well.

As with most pieces on the rise of blogging and participatory media, Clive can’t help but take a swing at PR folks and their craft. This marrs the story with causal assumptions. While I agree with the central tenet of the story – transparency is great and should be used to your advantage, the notion that you need to “fire your publicist” and “abandon the message” to be transparent is nonsense.

In fact, nothing in the story seems to support this or point to the fact that complete transparency is the luxury of the unlisted, closely-held start-up. Nearly every corporation other than RedFin cited in the story have an army of PR people encouraging and driving transparency. Not does it point to another real-estate brand – Zillow – that has achieved superior mindshare (albeit in a different segment of the real-state market) on the back of a great PR effort.

Now that’s not to say I don’t like Redfin. In fact, I love it. Redfin also has a PR rep and still seems to issue press releases… I wonder why…

Transparency and engagement are the hallmarks of all great communications – that doesn’t mean they don’t require publicists or messages.

I also find it hard to see Google as a “reputation management system”. It does no managing. Customers, bloggers, pundits and the like all have a new found power to shape reputations. Google mirrors the popular vote, effective optimizer of search, and ranks sentiment that isn’t necessarily a reflection of what your customers think but is a reflection of where the heard is running. Does that make it a “reputation management system” – I don’t think so.

What I do agree with is that Secrecy is dead. And Google is a terrific truth machine. And that customers have become “working partners”.

Thanks to Noel for the pointer… btw Noel, get a blog man!

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