Andy on Twitter

  • Further spotlighting the Wallabies Woes ,
  • Like wo has tapes anyway? Or even a tape recorder? Or a tape player? Or a fax? ,
  • RH: respect the opportunity you have @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: Stay humble. Work hard. What happened yesterday has no relevance to today or next week. Don't wait for chance. @Cannes_Lions,
  • RH: companies matter in terms of getting stories out to people. @Cannes_Lions,
  • RH points to Trad media co's entering OTT ... @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: nothing bad happens that doesn't have some good associated with it @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: Eventually will be a NFL team in London @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: The future is OTT - which means goodbye TV as we know it. Mobile + streaming + integration with games = winner @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft is concerned middle class not doing as well as they should. So right @Cannes_Lions,
  • The hard thing and the right thing are the same thing. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Practice patience. Never make a change unless you have something better. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Great orgs are built on inspired talent that is difficult to manage, sometimes large in confidence and ego, strong: Kraft at @Cannes_Lions,
  • The best tend to be the most creative - and tend to be the most difficult. As a leader you must learn to live with that. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Cannes debate underway.,
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Start-up Rules applied

I’ve long believed that every marketer should go work in a start-up at least once in their career if for no other reason than this. You get a profound and intimate understanding of the relationship between marketing and sales as expressed through the lead. Without a lead, there is nothing.

Carleen draws a line between this and baseball. I really enjoyed “Moneyball,” by Michael Lewis chronicling the successful statistics-driven management of Oakland Athletics General Manager, Billy Beane.

Just as he has applied math to sport, it has an equally important role in marketing and communications.

While the five tips she provides are all good, this one is extremely pertinent…

Trust your data. Even when your intuition suggests otherwise. You have to have the courage and conviction to trust your data, and act on it, Nelson says. If your data says spending money on conferences like CES or Web 2.0 Summit does not convert to sales, don’t go — no matter how important you think it is to be seen at such events.

This is perhaps hardest for communicators to accept. So often we are swayed by the emotions of those around us the data gets lost. We’ve all be subject to the rant by a product marketer about how we are “getting out-PRed…”. Without data you have nothing. Without conviction in your data you are well and truly up the creek without a paddle.

Speak Up — Add Your Thoughts

Connections

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