Andy on Twitter

  • Quarter final super rugby and the stadium looks pretty empty. Sad state of super rugby in AU,
  • Agree with Mark - don't get it. Don't need to be reminded that my sandwich was a beauty chook. ,
  • I just published “The Cannes Conundrum” ,
  • Church in London has a little cafe in the entrance serving Allpress coffee. How good is that. God and coffee to go. ,
  • That flight to London is one epic trip. Thanks for an enjoyable flight.,
  • Must read for all marketers... ,
  • ... instead correlate TV to commercial outcomes, not online viewing ,
  • ... but buying TV so people watch you on YouTube while trying to sell Tide... that's more than strange ... ,
  • Another reason TV is so important a part of the Mix - spillover into online engagement ... ,
  • Well that's a change. Might be better to focus on the tech stuff though. And the need for lots of it. ,
  • Some beautiful coffee kit here... ,
  • Further evidence that the IRB are nearly as out of touch with rugby performance as the ARU ,
  • Acquisition is important for growth... But if its is just replacing loss, it isn’t growth – it’s just churn .. ,
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The Apple Watch

My experience has been really mixed. I’ve avoided writing about it mainly because I think the experience is largely going to be personal – and its an experience worth trying. Then I stumbled across this interview with William Gibson:

What are your thoughts on Apple’s introduction of a product that, in a very specific way, is attempting to occupy the place once held by wristwatches? Is the Apple watch a watch at all?

I backed Pebble’s original Kickstarter, then wore Pebble exclusively for the better part of a year. Fascinating experience. It’s not “a watch”, as I assume the Apple, which I’ve yet to try, also isn’t. The fundamental difference between a watch and a smartwatch is that a watch’s central functionality is to tell time in isolation. That’s the essential core goal of the science of horology, really. A watch can perform its functions perfectly from within a Faraday cage. A smartwatch can’t: its function is to be a node in a distributed network. That was easy to see in the first Pebble: it had all the physical gravitas of the cheapest Bic pen, but, eventually, it had amazingly varied functionality, via connectivity. The Apple looks like jewelry. It’ll aspire to heirloom status but I doubt it will ever be that. Attempts to render smartphones as power jewelry fail. The Apple watch, I imagine, will be a dead platform in a few years, no more collectible than old iPhones. Because it’s nothing, really, without access to a system, and the system constantly outgrows it, evolves beyond it.

How have you found it?

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