Andy on Twitter

  • Further spotlighting the Wallabies Woes ,
  • Like wo has tapes anyway? Or even a tape recorder? Or a tape player? Or a fax? ,
  • RH: respect the opportunity you have @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: Stay humble. Work hard. What happened yesterday has no relevance to today or next week. Don't wait for chance. @Cannes_Lions,
  • RH: companies matter in terms of getting stories out to people. @Cannes_Lions,
  • RH points to Trad media co's entering OTT ... @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: nothing bad happens that doesn't have some good associated with it @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: Eventually will be a NFL team in London @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft: The future is OTT - which means goodbye TV as we know it. Mobile + streaming + integration with games = winner @Cannes_Lions,
  • Kraft is concerned middle class not doing as well as they should. So right @Cannes_Lions,
  • The hard thing and the right thing are the same thing. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Practice patience. Never make a change unless you have something better. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Great orgs are built on inspired talent that is difficult to manage, sometimes large in confidence and ego, strong: Kraft at @Cannes_Lions,
  • The best tend to be the most creative - and tend to be the most difficult. As a leader you must learn to live with that. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Cannes debate underway.,
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Less Venture Capital

Good read from Clarence Wooten via the 37 Signals blog:
The average venture capital fund size currently stands at $280 million, which presents a problem for VCs focused on investing in early-stage software companies. Generally speaking, the larger the fund, the more money it must invest on a deal-by-deal basis in order to justify the time commitment by the fund. But significant venture funding is not what today’s capital-efficient, Web 2.0 startups need—especially those that leverage the LAMP -stack, open-source frameworks and blog-fueled promotion. The old style of venture capital just doesn’t work for the type of company generally seen profiled on TechCrunch.

He goes on to say…

Instead of VCs changing their model to invest smaller amounts, we are seeing an increase in Series A valuations. It’s not that startups have suddenly becoming more valuable, it’s that funds need to deploy larger amounts of capital. Considering the movement towards less capital and competition by the likes of Google, VC’s are increasing the valuations of young companies. The valuation increase enables the fund to deploy enough capital to make the investment worth their time.

But…

The problem is that increased capital is always accompanied by expectations of increased return, which translates to increased time to liquidity and increased market risk. Unfortunately for the entrepreneur, additional capital seldom equals additional return. If the company is going to be sold, the acquisition price has to be significantly higher than it would be had the entrepreneur taken less venture capital to begin with. If it isn’t significantly higher, the entrepreneur stands to lose out on all or a substantial portion of their return. As many experienced during the bubble, this outcome was the norm, not the exception.

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