Andy on Twitter

  • Great piece of writing ... The Forgotten Legend of Silicon Valley’s Flying Saucer Man ,
  • Cardinal Pell, top advisor to Pope Francis, found guilty of ‘historical sexual offenses’ | America Magazine ,
  • Never buy a Miele appliance. Service levels are appalling. @MieleAustralia,
  • A Primer on Digital Humans by @soulmachines,
  • OK ... that's a quote to ponder: "In today's economy, innovation means elegant theft: robbery of your data, privacy… ,
  • Great read for all of you suffering from . ,
  • The wall of advertising on Facebook is getting ridiculous. On mobile every third thumb stroke yields another nearl… ,
  • If never ceases to amaze me the inane crap people will suggest marketing is about. What BS. Seth is better than th… ,
  • That could be it. Yikes. ,
  • Sad to see Rapha close in Sydney. They’ll loose the community and fans. And all that ransom shopping. That’s the i… ,
  • For all those upset that RL positions itself as a US company with NZ roots, this is why. Access to massive amounts… ,
  • Getting served ads -like that promoting the Apple App Store - and reconciling that with digital marketing’s claims… ,
  • When Mark says this I don’t think he is blaming anyone, just speaking the truth. “The biggest lesson from this year… ,
  • Another year. Another brilliant Ad. They've got some magic going here... ,
  • Spot on commentary about how marketers are missing a trick in owning and defining customer experience. Also like hi… ,

Archive for the ‘Link Love’ Category

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the Internet makes us superficial

Definitely plan to write more on this… Nick points to A recent edition of Science featured a worrying paper by University of Chicago sociologist James A. Evans titled Electronic Publication and the Narrowing of Science and Scholarship.

Seeking to learn more about how research is conducted online, Evans scoured a database of 34 million articles from science journals. He discovered a paradox: as journals begin publishing online, making it easier for researchers to find and search their contents, research tends to become more superficial.

Evans summarizes his findings in a new post on the Britannica Blog:

[My study] showed that as more journals and articles came online, the actual number of them cited in research decreased, and those that were cited tended to be of more recent vintage. This proved true for virtually all fields of science … Moreover, the easy online availability of sources has channeled researcher attention from the periphery to the core—to the most high-status journals. In short, searching online is more efficient, and hyperlinks quickly put researchers in touch with prevailing opinion, but they may also accelerate consensus and narrow the range of findings and ideas grappled with by scholars.

If part of the Carr thesis [in “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”] is that we are lazier online, and if efficiency is laziness (more results for less energy expended), then in professional science and scholarship, researchers yearn to be lazy…they want to produce more for less.

Ironically, my research suggests that one of the chief values of print library research is its poor indexing. Poor indexing—indexing by titles and authors, primarily within journals—likely had the unintended consequence of actually helping the integration of science and scholarship. By drawing researchers into a wider array of articles, print browsing and perusal may have facilitated broader comparisons and scholarship.

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Twitter Updates for 2008-03-05

  • back in Austin #
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Twitter Updates for 2008-02-29

  • off earnings and back to work now… #
  • wife says twittering is the lazy mans blogging… #
  • coming soon… writing a 6 page essay now #
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Twitter Updates for 2008-02-27

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Twitter Updates for 2008-02-26