Andy on Twitter

  • Cannes debate underway.,
  • Thanks for a great session and for the beautiful and inspiring work. @Cannes_Lions,
  • Profit of 8 pounds for every 1 spent - rallies employees in critical trading period - emotion pays @johnlewisretail,
  • 30+ media channels sustaining reach and supporting 40% of profits generated in 5 week window @johnlewisretail,
  • Started at 3m views now <45m and 85k parodies of Xmas ads - tease idea 2-3weeks in advance with bloggers @Cannes_Lions,
  • Entire agency works on the creative - team you least expect cracks it @Cannes_Lions,
  • Immense pressure when the country is waiting for your creative. JL on its creative process @Cannes_Lions,
  • Testing would have killed best creative - instead trust your smarts @Cannes_Lions,
  • Didn't realise John Lewis was a partnership @Cannes_Lions,
  • Massive effects of emotion and creative over time - would love to see awards for long running campaigns… ,
  • How do you do emotional priming in your campaigns? lessons from John Lewis,
  • Publicis prioritizing investment is super smart. Nothing to be gained from investing in Cannes. Way over priced ,
  • Cannes this year is both shallow and disappointing. Some ok content but overly commercial and no CMO agenda ,
  • Shares in Cannes Lions' owner fall as Publicis pulls out and WPP voices doubts ,
  • All marketing arcs lead to membership. @Cannes_Lions,

Archive for the ‘Link Love’ Category

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the Internet makes us superficial

Definitely plan to write more on this… Nick points to A recent edition of Science featured a worrying paper by University of Chicago sociologist James A. Evans titled Electronic Publication and the Narrowing of Science and Scholarship.

Seeking to learn more about how research is conducted online, Evans scoured a database of 34 million articles from science journals. He discovered a paradox: as journals begin publishing online, making it easier for researchers to find and search their contents, research tends to become more superficial.

Evans summarizes his findings in a new post on the Britannica Blog:

[My study] showed that as more journals and articles came online, the actual number of them cited in research decreased, and those that were cited tended to be of more recent vintage. This proved true for virtually all fields of science … Moreover, the easy online availability of sources has channeled researcher attention from the periphery to the core—to the most high-status journals. In short, searching online is more efficient, and hyperlinks quickly put researchers in touch with prevailing opinion, but they may also accelerate consensus and narrow the range of findings and ideas grappled with by scholars.

If part of the Carr thesis [in “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”] is that we are lazier online, and if efficiency is laziness (more results for less energy expended), then in professional science and scholarship, researchers yearn to be lazy…they want to produce more for less.

Ironically, my research suggests that one of the chief values of print library research is its poor indexing. Poor indexing—indexing by titles and authors, primarily within journals—likely had the unintended consequence of actually helping the integration of science and scholarship. By drawing researchers into a wider array of articles, print browsing and perusal may have facilitated broader comparisons and scholarship.

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Twitter Updates for 2008-03-05

  • back in Austin #
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Twitter Updates for 2008-02-29

  • off earnings and back to work now… #
  • wife says twittering is the lazy mans blogging… #
  • coming soon… writing a 6 page essay now #
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Twitter Updates for 2008-02-27

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Twitter Updates for 2008-02-26