Andy on Twitter

  • Great orgs are built on inspired talent that is difficult to manage, sometimes large in confidence and ego, strong: Kraft at @Cannes_Lions,
  • The best tend to be the most creative - and tend to be the most difficult. As a leader you must learn to live with that. Kraft @Cannes_Lions,
  • Cannes debate underway.,
  • Thanks for a great session and for the beautiful and inspiring work. @Cannes_Lions,
  • Profit of 8 pounds for every 1 spent - rallies employees in critical trading period - emotion pays @johnlewisretail,
  • 30+ media channels sustaining reach and supporting 40% of profits generated in 5 week window @johnlewisretail,
  • Started at 3m views now <45m and 85k parodies of Xmas ads - tease idea 2-3weeks in advance with bloggers @Cannes_Lions,
  • Entire agency works on the creative - team you least expect cracks it @Cannes_Lions,
  • Immense pressure when the country is waiting for your creative. JL on its creative process @Cannes_Lions,
  • Testing would have killed best creative - instead trust your smarts @Cannes_Lions,
  • Didn't realise John Lewis was a partnership @Cannes_Lions,
  • Massive effects of emotion and creative over time - would love to see awards for long running campaigns… ,
  • How do you do emotional priming in your campaigns? lessons from John Lewis,
  • Publicis prioritizing investment is super smart. Nothing to be gained from investing in Cannes. Way over priced ,
  • Cannes this year is both shallow and disappointing. Some ok content but overly commercial and no CMO agenda ,

Archive for September, 2006

  • Connect

Portals – WSJ.com

Lee Gomes on the use of the word Breakthrough in press releases. There are plenty of other common phrases. Like “leading” – if everyone is leading then who isn’t? A simple and imperfect Google search on ‘press release leading’ resulted in 92,700,999 results…

All companies, but especially those in technology, like few things better than to talk about their “breakthroughs,” those great leaps forward that make products out of the formerly impossible. A search by Factiva Consulting Services found that more than 8,600 press releases have been issued over the years with “breakthrough” in the headline, a majority of them by computer and electronics companies.

Our laziness in crafting news releases isn’t just tiresome, to Lee’s point, it perverts the very language we depend on for our trade.

Source: Portals – WSJ.com

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NZ Gets Gaming Studio…

NZ has a real richness of interactive talent so this is great news:

Microsoft announced Wednesday that it will be creating a video game studio in collaboration with “Lord of the Rings” director Peter Jackson. Wingnut will be based in New Zealand, Henson said. He would not elaborate on the business terms of the arrangement.

Link to Microsoft, Peter Jackson to form game studio | CNET News.com

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Engagement Level – A New Metric of Success for Online Advertising

Worth a read. Measuring engagement should be a priority for communicators as well. And I would extend the mandate to include all marketing.

  • Connect

US Airports Take The Liquids Out, Bangkok Puts It Back In…

Gizmodo reports that the new Bangkok airport will be cooled by fluids flowing beneath the floors: “Cold water flows directly underneath the floors on all levels, keeping the air a steady 70 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit up to 8.2 feet above the ground.” Very cool (sorry, couldn’t resist that…).

  • Connect

Explanations

"What emerges from months of interviews with employees ranging from fresh-out-of-college hires to the CEO is that Google firmly believes it has a framework for figuring out the future. It should come as no surprise that the plan is as irreverent, self-confident, and presumptuous as the company itself. Google’s executives don’t articulate it this way, but the framework can be found in the title of Shona Brown’s book: structured chaos. Indeed, along with Googleyness, chaos is among the most important aspects of Google’s self-image. Understanding how Google thinks about chaos — like Page’s teachable moment after Sandberg’s million-dollar mistake — is critical to divining where the company goes next. "Are lots of questions hanging out there in the market?" asks Sandberg. "Sure. Because we don’t always have an answer. We’re willing to tolerate that ambiguity and chaos because that’s where the room is for innovation." Good strategy — if it actually works."